Exfoliators & Scrubs

Achieve super-smooth summer holiday skin with our capsule collection of scrubs and exfoliants. Dry body brushing is ideal for sloughing dead skin cells, encouraging blood flow and optimising lymphatic drainage to get skin glowing and diminish dreaded ‘orange peel’, while our aromatic, in shower body buffers leave every inch of skin feeling beautifully baby smooth. An essential skin care step on the road to an enviably even and long-lasting tan.

Cross-section of all skin layers. Exfoliation involves the removal of the oldest dead skin cells on the skin’s outermost surface. Exfoliation is involved in all facials, during microdermabrasion or chemical peels. Exfoliation can be achieved by mechanical or chemical means.

This process involves physically scrubbing the skin with an abrasive.Mechanical exfoliants include microfiber cloths, adhesive exfoliation sheets, micro-bead facial scrubs, crepe paper, crushed apricot kernel or almond shells, sugar or salt crystals, pumice, and abrasive materials such as sponges, loofahs, brushes, and simply fingernails.Facial scrubs are available in over-the-counter products for application by the user. People with dry skin should avoid exfoliants which include a significant portion of pumice, or crushed volcanic rock. Pumice is considered a good material to exfoliate the skin of the feet. Microdermabrasion is another mechanical method of exfoliation. Chemical Chemical exfoliants include scrubs containing salicylic acid, glycolic acid, fruit enzymes, citric acid, or malic acid which may be applied in high concentrations by a medical professional, or in lower concentrations in over-the-counter products. Chemical exfoliation may involve the use of products that contain alpha hydroxy acids (AHAs), beta hydroxy acids (BHAs), or enzymes that act to loosen the glue-like substance that holds the cells together, allowing them to ease away. This type of exfoliation is recommended for people treating acne.In beauty spa treatment in continental Europe, the chemical properties of wine-producing grapes are exploited in the practice of vinotherapy which is becoming increasingly popular.

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