Creams & Moisturizers

Creams & Moisturizers

Moisturizer Moisturizers or emollients are complex mixtures of chemical agents (often occlusives help hold water in the skin after application, humectants attract moisture and emollients help smooth the skin.[1]) specially designed to make the external layers of the skin (epidermis) softer and more pliable. They increase the skin’s hydration (water content) by reducing evaporation. Naturally occurring skin lipids and sterols, as well as artificial or natural oils, humectants, emollients, lubricants, etc., may be part of the composition of commercial skin moisturizers. They usually are available as commercial products for cosmetic and therapeutic uses, but can also be made at home using common pharmacy ingredients.

Moisturizer A moisturiser (or moisturizer) is a liquid that is used for softening the skin, especially for naturally dry skins. They increase the skin’s water content by reducing evaporation. They can be quite a complicated chemical mixture. They may contain naturally occurring skin lipids and sterols, artificial or natural oils, emollients, lubricants,etc. Moisturisers are not always needed or used. They are most useful for persons with dry skin. Moisturizers are designed to either impart or restore hydration in the stratum corneum, which is an interactive, dynamic structure, and maintenance of hydration can impact its barrier function. How they act These are the effects of a moisturiser: Occlusives work by forming a thin film on the surface of the skin to prevent loss of moisture. Humectants attract water vapor from the air to moisturize the skin. Some add deficient materials. These aim to restore natural moisturizing factors on the skin.

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